About

On e-Reader Tech News we track down the latest e-Reader news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great e-reader tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest devices and accessories.

Recent Comments

August 2008
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Sep »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Sunday Night Links: 31 August 2008

Sunday Night Links

Welcome to the BlogKindle.com weekly news round-up!

Every Sunday we compile a list of our favourite stories from the past week, we also bring to you our selection of Kindle and Amazon related links from around the web. Compiled from blogs, magazines, main stream media and other sources, we hope these links will give you a definitive overview of what’s happening regarding the Kindle and what the Kindle community is talking about.

Amazon eyeing up the textbook market? About time – ZDNet

Here Comes Kindle 2.0 – Business Week

Amazon’s Kindle Goes to College – PC World

New Kindle an iPod mini-level design leap? – Electronista

Citigroup Analyst Eligible for Remedial Kindlegarten? – Digital Daily

Amazon Relies on Customers to Pimp the Kindle – Wired

Amazon: Kindle Isn’t *That* Big A Hit; College Edition In The Works – Silicon Ally Insider

How to avoid becoming a Kindle nerd-bore – The Atlantic

Amazon Confirms Student Version of Kindle – Seeking Alpha

Amazon’s Kindle May Go Back To School – Information Week

5 Joe Wikert – The Kindle Chronicles [podcast]

Discounted Kindles Tell a Story – The Motley Fool

If Amazon Really Wants To Get Serious About The Kindle… – TechCrunch

Amazon To Offer New Versions of Kindle e-Book Reader – Sci-Tech Today

Taking chances on Amazon’s Kindle – Byte-Sized

Rumor: Thinner, Stylish, Cheaper Kindle Coming Soon – Wired

Don’t believe the Kindle sales numbers … Amazon doesn’t – Used Book Blog

It’s Official: Kindle 2.0 Out Before Year’s End – K.indled

Guitar Tablature on the Amazon Kindle? – Fretbase

Amazon Kindle – glishara @ livejournal

Kindle Avantgarde case ready for pre-order 27th of August – stylzworld

Kindle Your Reading Habits – Doug Geivett’s Blog

Can a Polarizing Kindle Go Mainstream? – Decoding the Kindle

Amazon with more Kindles in the pipeline – definitely smaller, hopefully cheaper – Tech Digest

Kindle Photo of the Day #34: JavaOne 2008

Kindle Photo of the Day 34: JavaOne 2008

Photo by LostInBrittany

If you have an image that you would like to submit for Kindle Photo of the Day, then please get in touch! you can send the image via email to email address – please make sure you include your name and a link to your site.

Sony has lost the battle of the e-book

sony readerThe Sony Reader is a worthy opponent to the Kindle, however Sony has made some fundamental mistakes which will ultimately mean it will lose the battle for the e-book.

Sony’s chief executive, Sir Howard Stringer, noticed how Apple integrated is software and hardware to create a better customer experience, he added that Sony wants to make it as easy as possible to download or stream music, films and electronic data to all Sony electronic devices, from the PlayStation 3 to the Bravia Televisions. Sir Howard Stringer wants 90% of Sony devices to by wirelessly networked within 2 years.

However, Sir Howard Stringer vision seems to have fallen on deaf ears in the Sony Reader division. The Sony PRS-500 Reader had a commanding lead in the e-reader industry, but last November the Kindle was unveiled by Amazon. Amazon had done exactly what Sir Howard Stringer wanted to do with the Sony Reader, the Kindle was wirelessly networked to the Amazon book store, the hardware and software acting as one. Most importantly however, it made it easy for the consumer to buy books, something the Sony Reader never really achieved with its reader.

Back in 2006 when the Sony Reader was launched, Sir Howard wanted to let world know that this is sort of device that the new Sony wanted to make: both innovative and well-connected, but it was Amazon that showed them how it was really done.

Book selling is at the core of Amazon’s business, this is another advantage that Amazon has over Sony, it can leverage publishers to release books on its platform before any other, that’s something Sony would find very difficult to do. There are currently over 145,000 titles in the Kindle bookstore, the Sony bookstore has 45,000, that’s another area where Sony falls short.

The Kindle also offers so much more than the Sony Reader, daily newspapers, blogs, RSS subscriptions all without the need for a PC, with hacks you can even turn the Kindle into an email reader, an instant messenger and a web browser. You can buy a book any time and anywhere as long as you have a wireless connection, you cant do that on the Sony Reader.

Sony has consistently declined to release sales figures, which just might tell you something. Whilst Amazon hasn’t exactly been forthcoming with sales figures wither, we have learned that in its first 10 months the Kindle has sold over 240,000 devices, which isn’t a figure to be ashamed of, in-fact it blew most analyst estimates out of the water. To put it in context, the iPod first-year sales came to 360,000 devices, the Kindle is on course to match that figure.

Sony is now playing catchup, Sony’s Steve Haber has said that Sony is “open” to the idea of making the Reader a wireless device, but if you ask me, it may already be too late for them. Unless Sony’s next e-book reader is radically different to the current model and offers the same functionallity of the Kindle, im afriad its goodbye Sony Reader.

“The Clue of the Silver Key” by Edgar Wallace (1930) – Free Kindle e-book

The Clue of the Silver Key by Edgar WallaceAnna is the jewel of St. Petersburg society until she leaves her husband for the handsome and charming military officer, Count Vronsky. They fall in love, going beyond High Society’s acceptance of trivial adulterous dalliances. But when Vronsky’s love cools, Anna cannot bring herself to return to the husband she detests…

Excerpt:

Chapter One

They were all in this business–Dick Allenby, inventor and heir-at-law; Jerry Dornford, man about town and wastrel; Mike Hennessey, theatrical adventurer; Mary Lane, small part actress; Leo Moran, banker and speculator; Horace Tom Tickler–alas, for him!–was very much in it, though he knew nothing about it.

Mr Washington Wirth, who gave parties and loved flattery; old Hervey Lyne and the patient Binny, who pushed his invalid chair and made his breakfast and wrote his letters–and Surefoot Smith.

There came a day when Binny, who was an assiduous reader of newspapers that dealt with the more picturesque aspects of crime, was to find himself the focal point of attention and his evidence read by millions who had never before heard of him–a wonderful experience.

Mr Washington Wirth’s parties were most exclusive affairs and, in a sense, select. The guests were chosen with care, and might not, in the manner of the age, invite the uninvited to accompany them; but they were, as Mary Lane said, ‘an odd lot’. She went because Mike Hennessey asked her, and she rather liked the stout and lethargic Mike. People called him ‘poor old Mike’ because of his bankruptcies, but just now sympathy would be wasted on him. He had found Mr Washington Wirth, a patron of the theatre and things theatrical, and Mr Washington Wirth was a very rich man.

He was also a mysterious man. He was generally believed to live in the Midlands and to be associated with industry.

His London address was the Kellner Hotel, but he never slept there. His secretary would telephone in advance for the Imperial suite on a certain day, and on the evening of that day, when supper was laid for his twenty or thirty guests, and the specially hired orchestra was tuning up, he would appear, a stout, flaxen-haired man in horn-rimmed glasses. The uncharitable said his flaxen hair was a wig, which may or may not have been true.

He was perfectly tailored. He spoke in a high, falsetto voice, had a trick of clicking his heels and kissing the hands of his lady guests which was very Continental.

His guests were hand-picked. He chose–or Mike chose for him–the smaller theatrical fry; members of the chorus, small part actresses, an obscure singer or two.

Once Mike had suggested a brighter kind of party. Mr Wirth was shocked.

‘I want nothing fast,’ he said.

He loved adulation–and had his fill of it. He was a generous spender, a giver of expensive presents; people living on the verge of poverty might be excused a little flattering.

You could not gate-crash one of Mr Washington Wirth’s parties, invitations to which came in the shape of a small oblong badge, not unlike the badge worn by the ladies in the Royal Enclosure at Ascot, on which the name of the invited guest was written. This the recipient wore; it served a double purpose, for it enabled Mr Wirth to read and address each of his guests by her name.

Mary Lane was well aware that the invitation was no tribute to her own eminence.

‘I suppose if I had been a really important guest I shouldn’t have been invited?’ she said.

Mike smiled good-naturedly.

‘You are important, Mary–the most important person here. The old boy wanted to know you.’

‘Who is he?’

Mike shook his head. ‘He’s got all the money in the world,’ he said.

She laughed. Mary Lane was very lovely when she laughed.

She was conscious that Washington Wirth, albeit occupied with the cooing attention of two blonde lovelies, was watching her out of the side of his eyes.

‘He gives lots of parties, doesn’t he?’ she asked. ‘Dick Allenby told me today that they are monthly affairs. He must be rich, of course, or he wouldn’t keep our play running. Honestly, Mike, we must be losing a fortune at the Sheridan.’

Mike Hennessey took his cigar from his mouth and looked at the ash. ‘I’m not losing a fortune,’ he said. Then, most unexpectedly: ‘Old Hervey Lyne a friend of yours, Mary?’

She denied the friendship with some vigour. ‘No, he’s my guardian. Why?’

Mike put back his cigar deliberately.

The orchestra had struck up a waltz. Mr Wirth was gyrating awkwardly, holding at arm’s length a lady who was used to being held more tightly.

‘I had an idea you were connected,’ he said. ‘Money-lender, wasn’t he? That’s how he made his stuff. Is Mr Allenby related to him?’

There was a certain significance in the question, and she flushed.

‘Yes–his nephew.’ She was a little disconcerted. ‘Why?’

Mike looked past her at the dancers.

‘Trying to pretend they enjoy it,’ he said.’ They’re all getting gold-mounted handbags tonight–you’ll get yours.’

‘But why do you ask about Mr Lyne?’ she persisted.

‘Just wondering how well you knew the old man. No, he’s never lent me money. He wants gilt-edged security and I’ve never had it. Moran’s his banker.’

Mike was one of those disconcerting men whose speech followed the eccentric course of their thoughts.

He chuckled.

‘Funny, that, Mary. Moran’s his banker. You don’t see the joke, but I do.’

She knew Leo Moran slightly. He was by way of being a friend of Dick Allenby’s, and he was, she knew, a frequent visitor to the theatre, though he never came ‘back stage’.

When Mike was being cryptic it was a waste of time trying to catch up with him. She looked at her watch.

‘Will he be very annoyed if I leave soon? I’ve promised to go on to the Legation.’

He shook his head, took her gently by the arm, and led her up to where Mr Wirth was being delightfully entertained by three pretty girls who were trying to guess his age.

‘My little friend has to go, Mr Wirth,’ he said. ‘She’s got a rehearsal in the morning.’

‘Perfectly understood!’ said the host.

When he smiled he had white, even teeth, for which no thanks were due to nature.

‘Perfectly understood. Come again, Miss Mary Lane. I’ll be back from abroad in three weeks.’

She took his big, limp hand and shook it. Mike escorted her out and helped her into her coat.

‘Another hour for me and then I pack up,’ he said,’ He never stays after one. By the way, I’ll bring on your gift to the theatre.’

She liked Mike–everybody liked Mike. There was hardly an actor or an actress in London who had not agreed to take half-salary from him. He could cry very convincingly when he was ruined, and he was always ruined when hard-hearted people expected him to pay what he owed them.

Download the free ebook for your KindleDownload “The Clue of the Silver Key” by Edgar Wallace for your Kindle:

“The Clue of the Silver Key” by Edgar Wallace [.azw file]

Save $100 on a Kindle purchase, now just $259

Amazon.com has partnered up with Chase in a rare limited time offer where you can get up to $100 off the Kindle paying a total of $259 for the device – the offer ends on September 8th.

Get the Amazon Rewards Visa Card and Get $100 Off Kindle
Thanks to Chase, you get $100 off Kindle when you get the new Amazon.com Rewards Visa Card. Limited time only. Here’s how this works: 1) Apply Online. Get a response in as little as 30 seconds. If you’re approved, we will instantly add the card to your Amazon.com account and you’ll get $30 back on your credit card statement after your purchase. 2) Add a Kindle to your cart. 3) Place your order using the Amazon.com Rewards Visa Card and enter this promo code: VISACARD to get the additional $70 savings at checkout. Additional restrictions apply.

Now you might be thinking why is Chase offering to subsidise you up to $100 for a Kindle, well, they want you to start using their credit card called the Amazon.com Rewards Visa card, and over time Chase hopes to recoup the $100 through interest payments. The promotion is offered and paid for by Chase, not Amazon, so for those who have bought the Kindle in the past couple of weeks, Amazon wont refund you the $70 that Chase is subsidising the Kindle.

Once your approved for the card, which Amazon says takes less than a minute, Chase will add $30 in credit to your Amazon.com Rewards Visa card. Once the card is added to your Amazon.com account you can add the Kindle to your shopping cart and apply the “VISACARD” discount code for an additional $70 off. This code will only work if you add Kindle to you cart and go through the normal checkout process and don’t use 1-click, the discount should work even if you already have the Amazon.com Rewards Visa card, unfortunately the $30 credit is for new card customers only.

A Kindle for $259 was an offer too good for me to pass, for the last couple of weeks I’ve been thinking about getting a Kindle for my wife, once I heard about this offer my mind was made up – I was going to get it. Once I was approved for the card, sure enough I put the “VISACARD” code in and a $70 discount was applied to the Kindle. My wife’s shiny new Kindle should arrive on Monday, perfect.

Now I’m not a big user/fan of credit cards in any case, I religiously pay whatever I owe off every month, but since there isn’t a yearly fee for having the Amazon rewards card, I don’t mind applying for it, I guess it will just sit there nicely in my wallet. If you do decide to go for it, make sure you pay it off and don’t drive yourself into debt, if you don’t trust yourself you can always cut the card up as soon as you get it.

Will you be taking advantage of this offer?

Source: Amazon.com

Two new UK newspapers for the Kindle; the Times and the Financial Times

This week two new newspapers make it onto the Kindle – they are both British newspapers. The Times, which I don’t know an awful lot about, and the Financial Times which I adore and consider to be one of the best newspapers in the world.

The Times was first published in 1785 and is now owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation. The Financial Times has been in print since 1888 and its biggest competitor is The Wall Street Journal, while The Wall Street Journal has the higher subscription numbers, in my opinion the Financial Times has the superior content – I should know, Iv had it delivered to my home for the past four years.

The Times and the Financial Times bring the total numbers of newspapers on the Kindle to 24. Its been about 9 months since Kindle was released and I am a bit disappointed to see that only 24 newspapers have jumped onto the Kindle – 15 US based and 9 International newspapers. The USA Today currently has the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States with 2.25 million copies per weekday, however it has yet to make an appearance on the Kindle. We need more newspapers on the Kindle!

As usual, a 14-day free trial is available for both newspapers.

The Times (Kindle Edition)

The Times The Times is one of the world’s leading newspapers respected internationally for its news, comment and analysis. The aim of The Times is to provide its readers with strong news reporting combined with thoughtful and insightful opinions on the main issues of the day. Whether dealing with politics, business, foreign affairs, the arts, or sport, The Times offers the most comprehensive coverage. It has an outstanding global network of reporters as well as must-read columnists such as Matthew Parris, Gerard Baker, Caitlin Moran, Giles Coren and Anatole Kaletsky.

The Kindle Edition of The Times contains articles found in the print edition, but will not include some images and tables. Also, some features such as the crossword puzzle, box scores and classifieds are not currently available. For your convenience, issues are automatically delivered wirelessly to your Kindle so you can read them each morning.

Financial Times (Kindle Edition)

the Financial Times The Financial Times, one of the world’s leading business media organizations, is recognized globally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. The Financial Times provides a 360-degree perspective on global business and geopolitical news by harnessing a worldwide network of award-winning journalists who deliver extensive news, comment and analysis. The Financial Times is much more than a business newspaper, it is an intelligent and stimulating read covering everything from in depth art reviews to new discoveries in food and wine and interviews with the day’s luminaries. The Financial Times has an unrivaled collection of columnists, including Tyler Brûlé, Anthony Bolton, Clive Crook, Niall Ferguson, John Gapper, Robin Lane-Fox, Gideon Rachman, Jancis Robinson, Merryn Somerset-Webb, Philip Stevens, Lawrence H. Summers, Gillian Tett and Martin Wolf.

The US Kindle Edition of Financial Times contains most articles found in the US print edition, but will not include tables, charts and stock quotes. For your convenience, issues are automatically delivered wirelessly to your Kindle so you can read them each morning. The Financial Times US Edition is published Monday through Saturday.

E-Ink on phones

The Hitachi E-Ink display

The E Ink Corporation has announces that it’s Vizplex Imaging Film based displays will be available on the Hitachi W61H and on the Casio G’zOne range, both phones will incorporate e-ink technology into the outer display of the handsets. The technology is virtually identical to the display on the Kindle, just a lot smaller.

“We wanted features such as outdoor sunlight readability, 180 degree viewing angle, extremely thin, rugged, flexible display that consumed very little power,” said Satoshi Shirasawa, Marketing Manager for Casio Hitachi Mobile Communications, adding “E Ink’s electrophoretic display technology provided all that and more, something we could not get from other display technologies.”

On the Hitachi W61H the secondary display will cycle through 96 different animations, Japanese designer SeKiYuRiO created the W61H to resemble a perfume bottle. The 2.7″ e-ink display only activates when the phone is in use and will only be available in Japan.

Casio will also incorporate e-ink technology into their G’zOne range, and unlike the Hitachi, will show messages and the time instead of just animations on its secondary “Silhouette display”.

E-ink is proving to be a versatile technology, I guess it was only a matter of time before other applications for e-ink were discovered and utilised, cellphones seem to be the ideal candidate for e-ink displays. I don’t wear a watch any more, I use my phone for telling the time, however in bright sunlight, reading the LCD display is a bit tricky, not so with an e-ink display, I can see these devices becoming very popular.

The Hitachi E-Ink display

The Hitachi E-Ink display

The Hitachi E-Ink display

Source: Techradar

Kindle Photo of the Day #33: Jeff Bezos

Amazon Kindle Photo of the Day 33

Jeff Bezos is the founder and CEO of Amazon.com. Jeff spent his hour reading a manuscript on an Amazon Kindle.

Photo by video services

If you have an image that you would like to submit for Kindle Photo of the Day, then please get in touch! you can send the image via email to email address – please make sure you include your name and a link to your site.

PVI expects 10x growth in EPD market over next three years

Electrophoretic displays or EPD is the superb paper-like technology used in the Kindle and Sony Reader, it is often referred to as e-ink. Prime View International (PVI) is the company behind the production of many e-ink screens, they supply Amazon with e-ink screens for the Kindle. PVI chairman Scott Liu believes that the EPD market is set “to grow 10 times over the next three years”.

PVI president Ys Fu said clients’ shipping schedules for EPDs remain unaffected by the sluggishness hitting the small- to medium-size panel market.

PVI chairman Scott Liu said the EPD market will double in 2009 and staggering growth is expected to continue through the next three years. Foreseeing insufficient capacity to meet the strong demand for EPDs, PVI last year determined that it was necessary to acquire Korea’s BOE Hydis, which PVI has now officially taken over and renamed Hydis Technologies, Liu said.

PVI is still the only major supplier for e-ink displays in the world, and it did have a decline in panel sales, so declining panel sales don’t seem to agree with PVI chairman Scott Liu’s prediction that the EPD market will double in 2009. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that e-book reader sales are going down, we dont know what proportion of PVI’s sales are devoted to e-book readers, so a decline in sales by 33% doesnt tell us anything e-book reader growth. The economy also isnt in the best of shapes, so this might also be contributing to the decline in sales.

Source: DigiTimes

Kindle is like a Prius

Toyota Prius

Some would have you believe that the Toyota Prius is the answer to all our energy problems, however, it isn’t, its the step in-between. When you look up what the word Prius means “that which comes before” you will realise that the Prius is not the car of the future, the Prius comes before, to pave the way for the true car of the future.

In the same vein, I have come to realise that the Kindle is not the future of reading, but it is a Prius, it is what comes before. The much more important question is what will come next?

I will leave this open for you to ponder, your comments are welcome.