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On e-Reader Tech News we track down the latest e-Reader news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great e-reader tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest devices and accessories.

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April 2011
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Celebrate Monopoly Day with Monopoly for Kindle.

monopolyIn honor of Global Monopoly Day, there is a limited time discount offer going on now for the Kindle edition of Monopoly.  The game goes for 99 cents, and the sale ends on April 10th.

Monopoly for the Kindle includes most of the features of the well loved board game.  You can pass n’play with up to 3 other players.  Choose from 3 difficulty levels: easy, medium, and hard.

A. Taylor

“I wanted to hurry and write a review as I know a lot of people are considering purchasing this since the price is temporarily 50% off. I LOVE Monopoly so figured it was a safe bet for me. When you first start it seems a little strange until you get used to the flow of the game, but once you get past that, it is very simple to play. The developer did a nice job of simplifying the controls so that the game moves quickly. I’ve been playing it for about an hour straight since purchasing it, and really enjoy it so far. As of now, no freeze ups or problems. Great little cheap game — so far I highly recommend it. It is worth the full price easily, but grab it while it’s on sale!”

Suzanne F. Parrott

“I like that you can play with multiple people or against the computer. It even keeps track of stats (only if you and the computer are playing (according to the help)). There are three levels of play, Easy, Medium and Hard. You set this at the set up of the game by moving down to the AI player and clicking right or left. This allows you to add another human player, none, or the three levels of AI play.

You do have to hit the Controller after every move, even the AI. It gets tiresome; I have high hopes of the game improving over time.”

One thing that I’m interested in, is the colors.  One the regular Monopoly board game, the properties are denoted with colors.  I didn’t see much on how the Kindle has worked around this, but I’m sure a Kindle Color would be a great fit for this game, if there is one in the works for the future.

So have fun escaping jail and don’t forget to collect $200 when passing “Go”!

 

Kindle vs Nostalgia: Why Books Aren’t Harmed By eBooks

As somebody who both loves having a Kindle and who is proud of his fairly extensive physical library, it can be infuriating to hear people talk about their perception that eReaders stand in opposition to books.  I will certainly acknowledge that there is a completely different tactile experience that you get when reading a printed book.  I’m not even going to try to make the claim that it isn’t superior to that of the eReader, since that’s obviously a matter of personal preference rather than objective evaluation.  What I promote, however, is the idea that while it may be important in some cases, as a general rule the medium through which a text comes to you should always be secondary to the text itself.

When I buy a book, speaking solely for myself, I buy it because I want something to read.  When there’s something I particularly like, or when there’s an edition that adds something that can’t be found elsewhere, I grab a copy for the bookshelf.  This keeps it available, visible, easily referenced, and has a certain aesthetically pleasing effect.  In no situation that I can think of, however, would I grab a book that I have no interest in reading.  What would be the point?  Now, assuming you’re still with me to this point, it only stands to reason that eReaders like the Kindle make a book-lover’s life a little easier.

Even if you leave aside the issue of bulk and transportation when it comes to a paper book, there’s a big advantage to having books available electronically.  Availability.  An eBook never runs out at the local store, never goes out of print, and theoretically will never wear out.  While there is a certain nostalgia in picking up a well-loved old book that is just coming apart at the seams, I’d rather than a copy that is as readable the tenth time as it was the first.  And if I want to go back and read the author’s earlier works because I liked it so much, I don’t want to have to worry about the book being out of print or on weeks of back-order at the local book store.  In either of those cases, I’d be more likely to put the idea of reading what I want aside because it would be more hassle than enjoyment.  Thanks to the Kindle, no worries.

It should go without saying that this only serves to enhance the existing system rather than detract from it.  There will always be situations where you want a paper copy, whether it is to fill a book shelf, doodle in the margins, run a highlighter over, or what have you.  In the end, however, it’s better to have the text available.  That is the primary concern on which everything else rests, and the service that the Kindle provides.  One way or another, if an eBook has existed then it is highly unlikely that it will fail to be available should you need it.  This cannot be a bad thing, when what you truly care about is experiencing the text of a book.