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On e-Reader Tech News we track down the latest e-Reader news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great e-reader tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest devices and accessories.

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Daily Deals: The Dead Man and A Charlie Brown Christmas

Face Of EvilOnly today you have the chance to buy 5 books with price $0.99 for each. Usually Amazon makes discount only for 1 book per day. It is really good chance to add 5 books into your collection of horror written by Lee Goldberg and William Rabkin.

Lee Goldberg & William Rabkin on The Dead Man series

We grew up loving those “men’s action adventure” paperback novels of the 60s, 70s, and 80s…series like The DestroyerThe Ninja MasterNick Carter, and The Death Merchant. You could find them in finer supermarkets, gas stations, 7-11s and bookstores everywhere. They were the male equivalent of Harlequin romances,though the only romance was often between a man and his AK-47.

The books were short and tightly-written, with hard-boiled heroes, outrageously sexy women, and gleefully over-the-top plots. Nobody would ever mistake them for great literature, but they were enormous fun to read…and to write (we know, because Lee broke into publishing in the mid-1980s writing one of those series—.357 Vigilante aka The Jury Series under the pen name “Ian Ludlow”–while he was still in college).

Sadly, the “men’s action adventure” series novels are virtually extinct now, early victims of the narrowing of the paperback marketplace.

But the Kindle offers the perfect medium for the revival of the genre, which is why we’ve teamed up with over a dozen other writers on The Dead Man, an original series that we hope recaptures the spirit and pure escapism of the thousands of books written during the heyday of “men’s action adventure.”

Ring of Knives

The series is about Matthew Cahill, an ordinary man leading a simple life…until a shocking accident changes everything. Now he can see a nightmarish netherworld that nobody else does, making each day a journey…and an adventure.

New books in The Dead Man series will appear every month or so, just like they used to in paperback in the old days. Our other experienced Dead Man authors come from a wide cross-section of genres – mystery, westerns, horror, science fiction, thrillers, and cozies. And some of them also lead double-lives as Emmy award winning writer/producers of hit network TV series.

The Dead Man gives us the thrilling opportunity to indulge our great affection for the genre and hopefully get you hooked on it, too.  — Lee Goldberg & William Rabkin

Question: How did The Dead Man series come about?

William Rabkin: It started with a TV pilot script and 12 storylines that Lee and I wrote twenty years ago. The TV series didn’t sell, but we never stopped thinking about Matt Cahill… about what happened to him and what sorts of adventures he’d face. Finally we got sick of thinking about it and decided we’d write it ourselves as a series of books. Shortly after that, we had the idea of inviting some of the wildly creative, brilliant authors and screenwriters that we know to write books in the series as well…

Question: You are both avid fans of the “men’s action adventure” genre. What made you think The Dead Man could revive the genre?

Hell In HeavenLee Goldberg: It has all the elements of the classic men’s action-adventure series….a rugged hero, an open-ended mission, a clear enemy and the potential for lots of violence … but with an occult edge that allows us to imbue a dated genre with more surprising twists and darker humor. We felt by embracing the supernatural, and the traditional elements of the men’s action adventure genre, we opened the door to story- telling that would push the envelope a bit. More importantly, though, we adopted a voice, and an approach to the material, that we think is more character-based, more self-aware, and perhaps more wise-ass than most of those series were back in the day (with the possible exception of “The Destroyer”).

Question: You both love horror novels. Is there an author that you particularly admire?

William Rabkin: Stephen King, of course. He marries the human and the horrible so brilliantly that he transformed the genre forever.  In terms of writers who can carry a single character over a long and constantly exciting set of adventures, I’d love to see us compared to Lee Child.

Question: How do you two write your books together?

Lee Goldberg:  So far, the way we’ve done it is that one of us writes the first draft and the other one does the revisions (or suggests revisions that the other writer does). But we talk to one another throughout the process. I won’t tell you who wrote the first draft of which book…you’ll have to figure that one out for yourselves. But it won’t be easy. Bill and I have written together in television for so many years that we’re very good at creating and maintaining a shared voice, though this is the first time we’ve collaborated on books.

The Dead Woman

Here are some reviews:

Hell in Heaven is the best so far in an already splendid series and is super rush of a read with plenty of sharp twists and turns and some truly smashing lines. –Paul D. BrazillIf you haven’t read The Dead Man books you are certainly missing out on some terrific reads –Man-Eating Bookworm

This series has kept me rapt from the first page […]these authors are the Jamaican sprint team doing the 4x100m relay, each stage just gets better and better. –Right What You No

Hell in Heaven is a direct spiritual descendant of the sorts of awesome pulp action adventure tales that the greats like Robert E. Howard loved to write. –Post-Modern Pulps

For anyone who has not taken up the world of Matt Cahill yet, you are missing out on some truly crowd-pleasing fun. –Bookgasm

The story races by at a brisk rate of knots, each twist and turn, and shift in time providing another revelation […] I was enjoying it so much, I didn’t want it to end. –Permission to Kill Blog

The Blood MesaThe Dead Man: Face of Evil is a tight, well written, supernatural thriller [that] satisfies all on it’s own, while being a terrific opener that promises an epic tale to come. I’m excited for the next book. –Man Eating  Bookworm Blog
The Dead Man Face of Evil reminds me of Stephen King and Dean Koontz.[…]a fascinating horror story that leaves you wanting more, more, more! –Futures Mystery Anthology Magazine
“I’m hopeful they continue with this character since it’s set up so well. I’ve not seen a writing tandem like this since
 the glory days of Richard Sapir and Warren Murphy” –Bookgasm”Buckle up! The Dead Man: Face of Evil starts at full-speed and never lets up. This is big-ticket horror with characters you care about who are driven to the very edge. Highly recommended!” -New York Times bestseller Jonathan Maberry, author of Dead of Night

“….new series that perfectly recaptures the golden days of paperback fiction; The Dead Man series created by Lee Goldberg and William Rabkin.” ScarryMotherF….com

“I finished The Dead Man: Face of Evil last night and really enjoyed it. And admired it as a piece of work. The structure is ingenious, the large cast of characters (third person omniscient works here) are variously strong, weak, weird, funny, sad, scary and unique and the storytelling is sleek and relentless. I recommend it big time.” Warren Murphy author of The Destroyer Series

You can get Face Of Evil here, Ring of Knives here, Hell In Heaven here, The Dead Woman here and The Blood Mesa here. Also you can click at any picture of the book to get to Amazon site to buy it.

A Charlie Brown Christmas

A Charlie Brown Christmas, the beloved Peanuts classic by Charles M. Schulz, is now available as a spectacular interactive storybook optimized for your Android device. Sit back and enjoy original dialogue, digitally remastered illustrations, animation, music, and narration by Peter Robbins, the original voice of Charlie Brown.

“Isn’t there anyone who knows what Christmas is all about?!”

Only Charlie Brown can turn the magic of Christmas into a problem. Even though the snowflakes are falling softly, carols are ringing sweetly, and people are gathering merrily, Charlie Brown is feeling down. He just doesn’t understand Christmas. Join him, along with Snoopy and the entire Peanuts gang as they struggle to find the true meaning of Christmas. It’s all accompanied by a charming soundtrack featuring music and sound effects from the original show.

Reading is Wonder-Full

This version of A Charlie Brown Christmas is bursting with fun interactivities that will delight children and adults alike. Go caroling with the Peanuts choir, finger-paint with the gang, and participate in the Spectacular Super-Colossal Neighborhood Christmas Lights and Display Contest to unlock decorations for your very own Charlie Brown Christmas Tree. You can even play Schroeder’s piano (to the tune of “Linus and Lucy”, of course). Note highlighting helps to introduce and improve musical skills.

Little readers will love turning pages with the swipe of a finger. They can also watch text highlighting as they listen to the story narration, hear individual words spoken with a single tap, touch and drag objects to make them spring to life or tilt to watch them slide and move, and much more. With something to discover on every page, this is one interactive Peanuts adventure you won’t want to miss this holiday season!

“A beautifully designed app, and one that will tug at the heartstrings of anyone with fond memories of the animated specials.” – Wired

“Pitch-perfect app tribute to the holiday TV classic.” – Common Sense Media

“Well conceived, well executed, charming, fun, and educational.” – MacObserver

Kindle vs Kobo: Can Amazon’s Fire Win Against The Vox Internationally?

The Kindle Fire has made a big splash in the Tablet PC marketplace, driving prices down across the board and seemingly speeding along the release of direct competition from Amazon’s fellow eBook vendors.  Sadly, at the moment the Kindle Fire is only available in the US.  Chances are good, in fact, that there is going to be an extremely long wait before device is released anywhere else.  It is simply too reliant on the integration with Amazon’s Cloud Servers, Video Streaming, Android Appstore, and other such things that have not been prepared for other markets yet.

That doesn’t mean that people outside the US will want to overlook the Kindle Fire, of course.  Combine the $200 price tag with the almost complete lack of security measures to prevent Rooting of the device and you have a decent 7″ Android Tablet even if the quality of the custom OS is lost.  It does the job, if you’re willing to put up with all of the related complications of buying, shipping, rooting, etc.

The Kindle Fire isn’t the only option in this price range, though.  In fact the Kobo Vox, a similar competing tablet from an eBook vendor, is already available in the UK.  Even if it had nothing else going for it, and it does, the Vox’s availability would be enough to make it a major player in the new $200 tablet niche.  In addition to that, there is no need to root the device to get full functionality just about anywhere.  It comes with full access to the Android Marketplace already enabled, unlike either its Kindle or Nook competitors.

Admittedly the hardware isn’t as nice as the competition.  Neither the screen nor the processor is as nice as in the Kindle, which is itself criticized as lacking power by many.  They have made next to no effort to make the Kobo specifically ready for anything aside from the reading, which will already have some shortcomings given the backlit screen.  Since the primary competition will be rooted devices from the US, at least at first, this shouldn’t be too big a deal but it isn’t necessarily a recipe for long-term success.

As much as I’m a big fan of my Kindle Fire, neither option here thrills.  The Fire is amazing in many ways, but a big part of that is the seamless integration with Amazon’s services.  You lose that the second you take it out of the country.  The Vox, on the other hand, has no really exciting features.  When your tablet’s big claim to fame is extensive Facebook integration for a reading app, it is a stretch to see success in the future.  Either way you’re getting a 7″ tablet that runs Android 2.3 for around $200 (depending on local taxes and the cost of importing) but not much else.

As such, it seems unlikely that the Kindle Fire has much to fear from the Vox at the moment.  What will decide things is not where the two devices stand right this minute, but where they go from here on.  If Kobo can come around and start offering some really impressive incentives to use their tablet before Amazon extends their web service line sufficiently, there will be some real problems.  For now, the Kindle Fire wins ever so slightly based on narrowly superior hardware and nothing else.  Firm footing this is not.