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On e-Reader Tech News we track down the latest e-Reader news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great e-reader tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest devices and accessories.

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February 2012
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Daily Deals: Resurrection and Going Nuts

Resurrection

If you like to read science-fiction books Amazon offers to your attention the #1 Kindle Bestseller in Science Fiction in the US and the UK: Resurrection by Arwen Elys Dayton just for $0.99.

The Kinley built a ship capable of traveling faster than light. It carried a group of scientists to a small, distant planet – a primitive place called Earth. It’s mission was peaceful observation. But when the ship was destroyed, the Kinley crew found themselves stranded in ancient Egypt, participants in the pageant of life in the time of the Pharaohs. They buried remnants of their technology deep beneath the desert and sent a last desperate message home?

Five thousand years later, the Kinley homeworld hovers on the brink of extinction. An enemy that nearly obliterated their race has risen again?now with the ability to destroy them for good. A lone Kinley soldier named Pruit is sent on a desperate mission: to follow the ancient beacon back to Earth and recover the secrets to faster than light travel.

It is their last hope. Technology that once allowed them to cross vast reaches of space might allow them to outrun their enemies and find a safe world to call their own. But Pruit?s mission will be harder than she can imagine. Her quest will draw her enemies after her and will awaken ancient foes on Earth. As she gets closer to what she seeks, she will find each adversary willing to risk everything to stop her. Each hoping to steal the knowledge for themselves. The rivals will meet in modern-day Egypt and their struggle will alter the fate of worlds.

Going NutsGoing Nuts is a fun game for Android that involves navigating a cute flying squirrel through dense forests while gathering acorns. Enjoy power-ups, upgrades, exciting 3D graphics, OpenFeint achievements, and much more.

Go the Distance

As you fly though lush trees, burnt forests, and other landscapes, avoid colliding with trees and be sure to watch out for owls, bad nuts, and TNT tied to balloons. After each flight, see how far you flew and how many acorns you gathered. Level up and gain rewards by completing goals like collecting 50 nuts total or flying 1,000 meters in one try. You can also smash through obstacles with helmets or dress up as a classic stunt-person.

Go Shopping

After you’ve collected a stash of nuts, you might want to visit the Shop where you can buy power-ups, upgrades, and outfits. Get a Crash Helmet that allows you to survive one collision with a tree, a Magnet that pulls acorns toward you, or a Head Start that gives you a big flying boost. These and other goodies will set you back a few hundred or thousand acorns.

If you’re in the market for some new duds, you’ll be happy to know that the Shop offers an assortment of squirrel outfits, from Stuntman and Hot Rod to Skeleton and Flower Power. You can also check out your stats to find out how many acorns you grabbed, your longest flight, and the details of all your deaths.

Go Nuts

If you feel like flying all out, look into the various fun achievements available, including collecting 1,000 frozen nuts to achieve the Winter Coat, hitting 10 owls for the Avian Flu, and flying 200 meters without collecting a single nut to earn the Allergic to Nuts achievement. Show off with OpenFeint leaderboards and have fun Going Nuts!

The Amazon Kindle, eBooks, and Piracy

While it is hardly the only place that media piracy is coming up these days, eBook piracy is very much on the minds of publishers and booksellers.  There has been some informed speculation made that possibly as many as 20% of all eBooks currently loaded into devices like the Kindle are pirated rather than purchased.  The number is almost shockingly high for some and seems to demand a response.  The big question is what action could and should be successful.

Since I’m assuming that this reaches a relatively well informed and reasoning audience, I don’t need to spend much time on the fallacy of assuming that every eBook loaded onto a Kindle thanks to piracy is a lost sale.  Naturally this is not the case as studies have shown repeatedly when looking into music, movie, and video game piracy.  Most of these same studies have shown that piracy does not have any strong negative effect on sales at all, but let’s assume for the moment that at the very least it allows the market trends to shift based on where customers see the most value to be gained for their money.

This is where the piracy “problem” gets relevant.  Publishers wish to control the perceived value of their product.  It is problematic for them if customers are able to get the same quality of experience from a $3.99 eBook that they do from a $17.99 hardcover, as this has an adverse effect on a mainstay of traditional publishing.  Unfortunately, this sort of control can only be exercised in a situation where the publishers can regulate the flow of new work being made available to customers.  eBooks naturally render this impossible, especially given how simple it is to choose self publishing these days thanks to Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and others.

Do I agree with the idea that books should lose value in an environment where there are too many of them to possibly read?  Not entirely, but that’s just the way things work.  If you have two similar titles being offered for wildly different prices then the cheaper one is likely to win out, barring dramatically successful marketing efforts.  The only way that piracy really plays into this is in allowing readers to still have access to their favorite authors in situations where they would feel unable to justify paying now-outrageous prices.  This is not necessarily a view of the emotional or philosophical “rightness” of the act, just an awareness of the psychology at work.

When it comes right down to it, you can’t stop piracy.  No matter how restrictive the DRM, there are always more people interested in breaking it than maintaining it.  What you can do is adapt to the market and respect your customers.  Publishers who insist that if they can just shut down piracy sites and force Amazon to set high prices for Kindle books then all will be well are deluded.  The only way to control piracy is to make legal acquisition affordable enough and simple enough that the alternative is too much of a hassle to be considered.  The problem is not that the Kindle allows readers to access files they pick up from anywhere on the net, it’s things like the Big 6/Apple Agency Model implementation that try to freeze an entire form of media into an economic model that no longer functions.