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On e-Reader Tech News we track down the latest e-Reader news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great e-reader tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest devices and accessories.

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May 2018
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Amazon Opens a Spanish Language Kindle Store

On Thursday, Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) introduced the Spanish language Kindle and opened a Spanish Kindle store in Amazon.es.  The online retailer added Kindle stores in France and Germany earlier this year.  An Italian language Kindle Store was launched on Thursday along with the Spanish language store.

The Spanish Kindle Store hosts over 22,000 titles and includes 20 of the top 30 fiction and nonfiction bestsellers in Spain.  Independent authors can use Kindle Direct Publishing to publish their Spanish language Kindle books in Spain and 100 other countries worldwide.  Readers can also take advantage of a good sized collection of classics.

The Amazon press release noted that “Award-winning author and journalist Rosa Montero will offer three books exclusively in the Spanish Kindle Store, which were published using KDP: “La vida desnuda,” “Entrevistas” and “Lo mejor de Rosa Montero.”

Amazon Direct Publishing has given authors a chance to showcase their writing and provides them with success that they otherwise would not have achieved with the major publishing houses.

2011 has been a big year for Amazon on the international scene.  Amazon.es went online at the beginning of this year, and joined the other foreign language editions of the website.  The company is working hard to promote its bestselling e-reader internationally.  Kobo was the first to really push an international presence, but it looks like Amazon has caught on to that marketing strategy.  Customers outside of the US have mentioned in the past that they would love to be able to read their Kindles in other countries, as well as read books in other languages.

Spanish is one of the fastest growing languages worldwide, so it is only natural that Amazon should add a Kindle store for Spanish speaking countries.  I hope that the Kindle will continue to show increased success in Europe, and possibly venture into Asia and beyond at some point in the near future.

 

Amazon Bringing Kindle To Spain, Also Their Whole Store

Amazon is all set to launch their new Amazon.es site in Spain on September 15th, according to sources in several Spanish newspapers.  While the service will cover only physical goods at the time the store opens, it will expand to digital content including a Spanish Kindle Store before the end of the year.  This will be a big step in eCommerce for a country that has reportedly been somewhat late to the game so far, as well as expanding the Amazon empire even more.

The lack of a local Amazon presence hasn’t stopped the company from developing a substantial Spanish following over the years.  It is reportedly quite common for people to order through extra-national Amazon sites in order to ensure fair prices, reliable delivery, and good customer service in a way that hasn’t been directly available in the Spanish marketplace.  Some even associate the slow adoption of online retail in Spain to the fact that the country has lacked an Amazon presence up until now, so this will spur things for the better in a number of ways.

One place where Amazon will not necessarily have an automatic lead over the competition will, surprisingly, be in the field of eReading.  The Amazon.es site is slated to have a Kindle Store open late this year, while the Kobo release is expected any time now, if earlier promises to have their store open by the end of the summer can be believed.  Kobo has managed to outdo Kindle on the international front so far in a number of ways, so this is just another front in an ongoing conflict.

On top of the lack of status as the first people on the scene, the Kindle Store in question will not be able to set prices in an advantageous way.  There are means in place in Spain to fix eBook prices across the market at about 30% below the cost of their print equivalent. As in the US following the introduction of Agency Model pricing, Amazon will have to find other ways to add value to their platform aside from low prices.  If nothing else, at least it’s an effort that they have practice making.

Amazon currently maintains a presence beyond the United States in France, Germany, China, Italy, Canada, Japan, and the UK.  Their Kindle line has made it to the UK and Germany so far, with further international expansion said to be a priority.

Many have conjectured that there will be a large push with localized devices is loosely planned for after the introduction of a Kindle without a hardware keyboard, which would obviously help with pressing adoption in countries where English is not the primary language.  Time will tell if this manifests, but with many expecting a new Kindle with a touchscreen as early as October there would seem to be very little to prevent it.  The speculated-upon move to an Android OS for the Kindle eReader in addition to the Kindle Tablet might make localization more problematic, but until an implementation is actually seen it is hard to do more than speculate.

Worldreader.org: A Library at your Fingertips

Worldreader.org is a nonprofit organization that provides e-book readers such as the Kindle for children in poorer areas who have limited access to books and libraries.  Their first trial took place in Barcelona, Spain, and they are currently conducting another trial in Ghana.  Follow their blog for recent updates and testimonies by the children who received Kindles. According to their website, Worldreader.org “is a US- and Barcelona-based not-for-profit organization founded by Colin McElwee, ex-Director of Marketing of ESADE Business School, and David Risher, a former executive at Amazon.com and Microsoft Corporation.”  It is certainly a plus to have an Amazon.com former employee on board.

Providing the Kindle for children in Spain, Ghana, and any future locations opens up a whole new world for reading.  Providing books in print makes a small dent in crossing literacy barriers, but often leads to a limited selection because books take up so much space.  The Kindle is the size of one book, but provides access to many, many books.  Amazon’s Kindle store currently carries 450,000 books, many of which are free.  The Kindle is a reader’s treasure trove right at your fingertips.

The cost is a factor, but Amazon donated ten Kindles to Worldreader.org to start their project.  The organization currently purchases the Kindles with local government and donated money.  With the e-reader competition heating up, the price of the Kindle will surely drop significantly.  Once that happens, there is great potential for organizations like Worldreader.org to take literacy via the Kindle to many more areas that otherwise would not have a chance at breaking down literacy barriers.